Cornish fury at Greggs after sausage roll giant confirms it will open a new store in Truro next month

Cornish fury at Greggs after the sausage roll giant confirmed it will open a new store in Truro next month, three years after the first attempt to crack the county ended in a humiliating recall dubbed ‘Greggxit’

  • The popular bakery is set to open a shop in the Cornish town of Truro next month
  • Three years ago he withdrew from the country in a move dubbed ‘Greggxit’
  • He has since returned and plans to open his third branch in Cornwall.
  • The move has raised fears that local bakeries could be taken out of business.

A move by Greggs to open a new store in a Cornish town has sparked fury in the county amid fears it could drive local bakeries out of business.

The bakery giant, which has more than 2,000 stores across the UK, will open its new Truro branch next month, almost three years after its first move to the county ended prematurely.

However, he has since opened two stores, and the prospect of a third, this time in the Cornish capital, has raised tensions.

The new branch would be hundreds of yards from Rowe’s and Warrens, which claims to be the oldest producer of Cornish Pasty’s in the world.

Locals have branded the Newcastle-based bakery “the devil’s spawn”, reports The Telegraph, and while some are confident it won’t survive, others aren’t so sure.

Some worry that ‘tourists’ will flock to the household name rather than local businesses that have been in the area for decades.

The new Greggs store, pictured here, will open in St Nicholas Street, Truro, on Tuesday 6th December.

The new Greggs store, pictured here, will open in St Nicholas Street, Truro, on Tuesday 6th December.

The new store opens on the site of a former branch of the Co-op Building Society and Bristol and West on St Nicholas Street on Tuesday 6 December, three months late.

Earlier this week, Greggs refused to reveal to local publication Cornwall Live why its opening had been delayed.

A Greggs spokeswoman only confirmed that the store would “open sometime this year.”

The chain’s first attempt to break into the pasta market was in 2019 when an ill-fated shop next door to the Carkeel Roundabout in Saltash closed after seven months of operation.

Choosing to remain loyal to its famous Cornish Pasties, locals chose to avoid the bakery chain, bucking the trend compared to the rest of the UK, where Greggs has seen tremendous growth.

Bosses later said the store had been closed following a ‘thorough review’, with locals calling the victory ‘Greggxit’.

However, the chain returned to Cornwall months later, in October 2019, opening a outlet on the A30 services.

This was followed by a second store in the Penngyllam Industrial Estate on the outskirts of Launceston, which opened in the summer of 2020.

In October 2021, signs began appearing on the site in Truro, a stone’s throw from Cornish pie makers Rowe’s and Warrens.

There are fears that the opening of a Greggs in Truro could have a negative impact on local bakeries (file image)

There are fears that the opening of a Greggs in Truro could have a negative impact on local bakeries (file image)

Speaking to the Telegraph, David Harris, a local Tory councillor, said it’s up to the customers who they buy their pies from.

“Cornish pasties are a very local thing,” he said. ‘If you get a good one, it’s beautiful. If you get a cheap and cheerful one it’s disgusting…

“If people don’t buy them, they go out of business, it’s as simple as that.”

People in the Truro Our City Facebook group said they understood the outlet was struggling to hire staff.

They have also been divided on whether they like the idea of ​​a Greggs coming to Truro.

One commented: ‘All the tourists will go there because it’s a brand they know… here comes the beginning of the end for local bakeries.’

Another said: “I don’t think it stays long in Truro, hardly anyone wants it. I had a Greggs sausage roll and it was like it wasn’t cooked, definitely won’t be trying another.”

Greggs has been contacted for comment.

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